Home

Strange Wonderful Things

 Rare and exotic plants

Turquoise Puya

Sinningia stapelioides "Pancas"

This is a close look at the unusual Sinningia stapelioides from Brazil.  This rare African Violet relative makes a big tuber, a huge leaf, and attractive blooms that resemble those of Stapelia plants, hence the species name.  This is a new species that unfortunately is endangered, with only a few plants left in the wild.  While it's not commonly available, i've found that it's easy to grow.

Sinningia stapelioides "Pancas"

Sinningia stapelioides "Pancas"

The tuber can grow over 4 inches wide, and it makes 1 or occasionally 2 leaves that can get over a foot long.  They have a velvety texture thanks to tiny, soft hairs.  At the end of the growing season, it drops the leaf and then flowers straight from the bare tuber, which is unusual for Sinningias.  The reddish-brown coating you see on top of the tuber are future stems waiting their turn to grow, like shark's teeth!  It sends up several flowering stems, each with several large blooms about 2 long.  These pinkish-red blooms have lots of intricate burgundy veins inside.  Unlike Stapelia flowers, which smell horribly, these fortunately have no scent!  Feel free to cross-breed them with other Sinningias to create unique new hybrids.

Sinningia stapelioides "Pancas"

Sinningia stapelioides "Pancas"

It comes from a mild climate, so it grows well for me indoors between 60 and 80 degrees F (16-27C).  I don't know how much cold and heat it's able to take.  It enjoys bright filtered light or part sun.  Despite what some say, it doesn't need natural light or short days to flower.  It flowers for me under an LED panel that's on 16 hours per day.  It grows nicely in a small pot in a typical well-draining mix that's kept evenly moist.  When the tuber goes dormant, avoid letting the soil get dry, since this seems to prevent flowering.  Over about 40% humidity is best.

 

Germinating the seeds

Check availability

 

Home

Strange Wonderful Things

Rare and exotic plants

Turquoise Puya

Entire site Copyright 2003-2023 by Strange Wonderful Things, except as noted